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Ornamental Vector Clipart
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Ornamental Vector Clipart
Created by: Doro Sensen

With the Preset-Shapes tool of PSP, you can create nice ornamental clipart! And combined with the vector feature that we will use here, it's even easier than before; and the big advantage of vector graphics is that their size can be changed without quality loss. We will make some ornamental clipart from circles here, but of course any other shape or a combination of shapes can be used for ornaments as well – just draw some diagonals, rotate the shape a bit, ...
Let's first make a rather simple one. Open a new image:
– Width = 200
– Height = 200
– Background = white
– Image type = 16.7 Million Colors
Go to View || Change Grid and Guide Properties. In the "Grids" panel, set:
– Units = Pixels
– Horizontal Spacing = 25
– Vertical Spacing = 25
– Line color = green (Red = 0, Green = 128, Blue = 0)

Now go to View || Grid to display the grid in your image.

Click on the Preset-Shapes tool in your tool palette:
– Shape Type = Ellipse
– Retain style = unchecked
– Antialias = unchecked (can be changed afterwards)
– Create as vector = checked
– Line width = 1
– Line style = Default line
Set your foreground style to Solid Color (click on the little arrow in the Foreground-Style box and choose the little brush icon on the left) and your background style to None (click on the little arrow in the Background-Style box and choose the icon on the right). Your textures should also both be set to None.
Make black your foreground colour; background colour doesn't matter.
Keep the Shift key pressed and draw a circle with a radius of 50 pixels in the center of your image: begin at coordinates (100,100) – you can see them on the left in your status line – and draw two grids to the right.
Don't deselect. Go to Edit || Copy (Ctrl+C) to copy the circle.
Click on the Vector Object Selection tool in your tool palette and then on the "Properties" button in your Tool Options palette (or right-click on your image and choose "Properties" from the context menu). Set a bright red now for "Styles: Stroke" so that you can see the center circle well when adding further circles.
Now go to Edit || Paste || As New Vector Selection (Ctrl+G). Place the new circle so that its center is one grid above the center of the red circle. Repeat the last step (pasting or Ctrl+G) three times, and move the other circles one grid to the right, one grid to the left and one grid down.
There are now five circle layers in the vector layer (Layer 1) in your layer palette; you can see them if you click on the little plus sign in front of the vector-layer icon. Click on the little glasses of the circle layer at the bottom to make the red center circle invisible.
Now go to View || Grid to get rid of the grid in your image.

Voilà – a nice little rosette, still quite simple.

We can make this simple rosette more complex by just a few steps:

Leave "Layer 1" selected in your layer palette (if it isn't selected, just click on it). Now copy the whole layer (Edit || Copy or Ctrl+C) and paste it as a new layer (Edit || Paste || As New Layer or Ctrl+L) into your image. You'll now have one of two cases:
  1. (Quite unprobable:) Your two rosettes are placed perfectly one above the other, i.e. your picture looks like the rosette above. In this case you're lucky and can skip the next step.
  2. Your two rosettes are not perfectly one above the other, like in the picture on the left. That is because your first center circle was not perfectly in the center of your picture, but a new layer is always centered. In this case you do the following:
  3. Delete "Layer 1" (click on it in the layer palette and then on the little trash can), and once again go to Edit || Paste || As New Layer (Ctrl+L). Now you should have two vector layers with your rosette, both perfectly centered in your picture.

Now with one of the vector layers selected (it doesn't matter which one), go to Image || Rotate (Ctrl+R):
– Direction = Right or Left, doesn't matter
– Degrees = Free, 45
– All Layers = unchecked.
And there you have a much more complex ornament where you can hardly recognize your first rosette anymore!
Let's make one more rosette and ornament! I really liked this rosette when I first "met" it in the geometry lessons at school, and it gave me the idea for this tutorial. The beginning is the same as for the first rosette above:
Open a new image:
– Width = 250
– Height = 250
– Background = white
– Image type = 16.7 Million Colors
Go to View || Grid to make your grid visible again. Then click on the Preset-Shapes tool in your tool palette, and again draw a circle with a radius of 50 pixels in the center of your image: begin at coordinates (125,125) and draw two grids to the right (remember to press the Shift key for drawing a circle).
  Copy the circle, and then turn it red: click on the Vector Object Selection tool in your tool palette and then on the "Properties" button in your Tool Options palette (or right-click on the image and choose "Properties" from the context menu), and choose red for "Styles: Stroke".
No go to Edit || Paste || As New Vector Selection again (Ctrl+G). For this rosette, move your new circle so that its center is two grids above the center of the red circle, right on the topmost point of the red circle. Now get rid of your grid (View || Grid). Paste another circle, and move the center of this one to the point where the first black circle crosses the red one. Move around the center circle this way, pasting six circles all in all around it.
When you're done with that and turn your red center circle invisible, you'll have the rosette on the left.
Copied, pasted as new layer, then one layer rotated by 30 degrees to the right or left results in the ornament on the right.
I hope you enjoyed playing around a bit with circles! Other preset shapes will also make nice ornaments, just play around a bit, rotate and combine them ... – Happy "ornamenting"! :-))